Making Leadership Learning More Effective

by Rossana Espinoza 0

Why Simulation Experiences Make Leadership Learning More Effective

 

 

One of the most effective techniques we use in our Leading Departments programme is to provide leaders with a simulated environment, challenging participants to confront complex, highly interwoven performance management and operational issues. Paul Hessey, Advance HE associate leads on this activity on our Leading Departments programme for new heads of department, explains how the technique works.

Simulation experiences for effective leadership

 

Based on a very realistic university scenario, the programme participants work in groups of six along with three actors who take on the roles of stakeholders and the dean. The simulation is designed to present participants with realistic scenarios they might encounter in their day-to-day work as a head of department. In turn, this gives the facilitators the opportunity to help participants identify their weaknesses and strengths and enables us to offer guidance and best practice on how to approach difficult situations.

This method has three main benefits:

  1. Participants are reminded of some simple, robust and powerful theory of influence and learn the skills they need to put that theory into practice in a safe environment.
  2. Reflect and receive tailored feedback on strengths and development opportunities.
  3. Be part of a rich and diverse range of colleagues from both professional service and academic roles, and benefit from observing a wide range of approaches to influencing in action.

Our approach is more ‘real play’ than ‘role play’ because essentially the participants are experimenting with being themselves in the scenario, rather than taking on a character. In terms of being surprised by how participants react to these activities I am always taken aback by the way participants are committed to a mythical department. They really immerse themselves into the activity and come up with creative ideas and solutions. During coaching sessions I found that many participants realised that they want and need to take a more strategic view of their role; in particular delegating more so they can take a step back to better develop and promote their own department through running events and engaging with a pool of stakeholders. These scenarios also increase their awareness of the importance of owning their professional profile and reputation.

I know that some people may be sceptical about the benefits of using this technique. Real play has an interactive approach which means participants can take a very practical look at how people communicate and influence, and then experiment with different approaches. Real play gives participants the chance to safely assess and practice an expanded range of influencing, management and leadership techniques to help them better engage their own diverse stakeholder base.

I’ve worked in many sectors besides higher education and I’ve found that people face the same challenges other sectors do in terms of politics and culture. However, in higher education people are perhaps more motivated by their desire to achieve their professional objectives rather than financial incentives. In higher education environments in particular, I’ve noticed that leaders may have less access to organisational benefits and consequences to motivate those around them. They are therefore often seeking to achieve action in their institutions by influencing others without any direct authority or power to demand action. Instead they must find a way to overcome resistance and challenge and encourage staff to buy-in and commit to the mission in a positive way. Many participants have said that they leave the Leading Departments programme feeling more equipped and confident to do exactly that.

Find out more about the Leading Departments programme.